From My Ink Pot

On the Moon Chasing the Breer Rabbit

Camera porn day #heckyes #mycameragotswallowedbythebigguns

Anonymous said: Hi Sha'an, can you recommend some art related books that you find interesting? :) Thank you!

furrylittlepeach:

Ah! Perfect time to answer this as I’m currently in bed filtering through pages of my art magazine/book collection with post-its for 3am inspiration bursts!

Some of my favourite books include Street Sketchbook, Sketchbook: Journeys and Graphic. - all published by Thames & Hudson these books are a much loved collection of mine as they give a window into the mind and sketchbooks of well known (and in some cases unknown by me) artists, graphic designers and street artists. There’s just something about seeing someone’s quick drawings and doodled thoughts that gets me going - they’re so raw and VERY inspiring if you’re having trouble organising your thoughts so a definite recommendation. 

If you’re into Typography, Typoholic and Reinventing Lettering are a couple on my shelf that I love. The first is more of a visual collection of diverse and amazing typography from a range of artists, the second is more of if a how-to book and Typoholic had a baby. 

If you’re having a creative block/want to re-strategise how to tackle creative briefs or endeavours I would suggest The A - Z of Visual Ideas (not just because of the amazing front cover), Steal Like an Artist, and 100 Things Every Designer Needs To Know About People. A lot of the things in these books I generally knew but it was good to be reminded and know I was going in the right direction, I didn’t necessarily take all of the advice given but what’s more of a pick-me-up than some light-hearted, creative self-help books over breakfast.

If you’re a graphic design/packaging student, Structural Packaging has been really helpful in terms of a bunch of interesting packaging solutions with digital templates (in InDesign, Illustrator etc format) included to base your own designs off of. And I didn’t even have to mention the rad cover/packaging.

Magazine’s you should subscribe to should you find money and desire: Smith JournalIdN, Empty (you’ll need to find a place to backorder because they’ve just released their final issue!), Frankie, and Wooden Toy.

I’m getting pins and needles in my foot so I’m going to go freak out, I hope this was of use to you and may you be forever inspired! x

Anonymous said: Hello, i want you ask: what you use for preping wood for paiting? :)

furrylittlepeach:

I’m so lucky my sister is an amazing artist because she gave me some amazing tips when she came over for pizza the other night. (This is for oils/acrylic on timber).

1. Sand your timber smooth.
2. Coat the wood with a 2:1 PVA, water mix OR a clear gesso in a couple of layers. Let it dry in between layers.
3. Make the magic happen and let your piece dry.
4. Coat with a decent quality oil varnish with a soft brush (a thin layer as not to disturb your painting) / wax varnish.

I’m about to use this method, I used to just sand the wood, but this will prolong the paintings life and keep it looking schhhhmick! I hope this helps, if in doubt ask your local art store, they know best! x 

fastcompany:

No more excuses: Stop procrastinating and get to work with these tips.
One of the biggest problems you need to solve if you work for yourself is how to make yourself do work.
The best entrepreneurs have figured it out and just pound out the work they need to do.
But many others put off their dream careers, or stay in jobs they don’t like, because they’re afraid to figure this out. Being in a job, or staying in college, means that you have someone else imposing work and deadlines on you, and you’ll get fired (or dropped from school) if you don’t do the work. So you put off doing the work until you can’t anymore because of the fear of being fired.
What does this say about us? It’s saying that we can’t trust ourselves enough to figure out how to motivate ourselves. I know, because I was in this boat for many years. It wasn’t until I started to learn to solve this problem that I found the courage to work for myself.
It’s solvable. It’s not easy, but it’s doable. And you can do it just as much as I can—I’m no superman, trust me. I feel lazy, I procrastinate, I fear failure, just like anyone else. But I’ve learned a few things that work for me.
What works for you will be different, but here are some ideas I use that might help:
Read More> 

fastcompany:

No more excuses: Stop procrastinating and get to work with these tips.

One of the biggest problems you need to solve if you work for yourself is how to make yourself do work.

The best entrepreneurs have figured it out and just pound out the work they need to do.

But many others put off their dream careers, or stay in jobs they don’t like, because they’re afraid to figure this out. Being in a job, or staying in college, means that you have someone else imposing work and deadlines on you, and you’ll get fired (or dropped from school) if you don’t do the work. So you put off doing the work until you can’t anymore because of the fear of being fired.

What does this say about us? It’s saying that we can’t trust ourselves enough to figure out how to motivate ourselves. I know, because I was in this boat for many years. It wasn’t until I started to learn to solve this problem that I found the courage to work for myself.

It’s solvable. It’s not easy, but it’s doable. And you can do it just as much as I can—I’m no superman, trust me. I feel lazy, I procrastinate, I fear failure, just like anyone else. But I’ve learned a few things that work for me.

What works for you will be different, but here are some ideas I use that might help:

Read More> 

saison-s:

Boho Living: artist’s space em We Heart It.

saison-s:

Boho Living: artist’s space em We Heart It.

(via booksandpublishing)

Learning Lightroom…
The third draft! Just something casual but my perfectionism is blocking me from finishing this post. #darkroom #appforwriters #nodistraction

stay-au-ponyboy said: What is your best advice to a budding writer around 16 whose father is one of those of the opinion that "dreams don't come true" and "writing isn't a real job"? He discourages her in more ways than one and it hurts her a lot. (it's me. The budding writer is me, hello)

neil-gaiman:

Perhaps he was hurt enough to believe that we cannot make our dreams come true, and he may want to protect you from similar hurt.

He may just want to be sure you can feed yourself as an adult. I remember a concerned mother, at a school careers evening, telling me that little Johnny wanted to know if there was career safety in being a Freelance Writer, and I told her no, probably she and little Johnny should go and talk to the people in the main hall about hotel administration and such…

Writing is definitely a real job. I know many, many writers who make a living wage from their words (fewer who make Lots of Money, but I know them too). And there are a great many people out there who have dreams and, through a combination of work and dedication and luck, make those dreams come true, whether as writers, actors, artists, computer programmers, architects, doctors, or marine biologists or owner-performers of travelling circuses.

My best advice is to keep your own counsel, to write and to read everything you can, to learn as much as you can, to write and finish things and keep writing. And whether you will still want to be a writer when you are 26 or 46 doesn’t matter. Learn your craft, learn everything else you can. Enjoy it.

Had to reblog this! Good advice

nypl:

Today we celebrate the legacy of a remarkable author - Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Although he left us too soon, his words remain. So visit your local library today and check out your favorite book - whether it’s 100 Years of Solitude, Love in the Time of Cholera or The Autumn of the Patriarch - and love the words of the exceptional Gabriel Garcia Marquez.